Tag Archives: BAE Systems

1,000-Tonne Nuclear Submarine Passes Through Residential Streets In Barrow

1,000-Tonne Nuclear Submarine Passes Through Residential Streets In Barrow

The unit belonging to defence company BAE Systems is the heaviest ever moved and was taken to Devonshire Dock Hall in Barrow-in-Furness from the New Assembly Shop in Bridge Road, Barrow

 

People say you can’t even step out your front door these days.

That’s certainly the case if a 1,000-tonne piece of nuclear submarine happens to be rolling down your street.

But that is exactly what happened in Barrow in Cumbria on Sunday, when a submarine unit weighing more than 1,000 tonnes was transported to an indoor shipping complex.

The unit belonging to defence company BAE Systems is the heaviest ever moved and was taken to Devonshire Dock Hall in Barrow-in-Furness from the New Assembly Shop in Bridge Road, Barrow.

The unit will form part of an Astute class nuclear-powered submarine. Two such submarines – HMS Astute and HMS Ambush – are already in service.

Four more submarines are being constructed at Barrow: Audacious, Anson, Agamemnon and an as-yet-unnamed submarine.

BAE Systems was awarded the contract for the fifth submarine last month, taking the total value for work on the vessel to £1.3 billion.

Manufacture of the submarine began in 2010 and HMS Anson is on schedule to begin sea trials in 2020.

Link – Yahoo Story

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UK – First glimpse of new nuclear subs

Defence bosses have revealed the first glimpse at the  future  of Britain’s nuclear deterrent today, publishing the first artist’s impression  of the submarines due to replace the Vanguard-class boats which carry Trident  missiles.

The image was included on the cover of the second annual report to MPs about  developments in the Successor Submarine programme.

 ​DEFENCETrident

 

The boats are designed to be amongst the stealthiest in the world and the  image, created by the design  team  working on the new vessels, shows a submarine built with sweeping curves.

In the report to MPs, the Ministry of Defence announced it had agreed two  contracts worth a total of £79 million to BAE Systems Maritime-Submarines for  initial work on the new  vessels, which are due to be in service by 2028.

The items include structural fittings, electrical equipment, castings and  forgings which must be ordered now, Defence Secretary Philip Hammond said.

Mr Hammond said: “The Successor programme is supporting around 2,000 jobs and  up to 850 British businesses could benefit from the supply chain as we exploit  the most modern technologies, and employ a significant portion of the UK’s  engineers, project  managers  and technicians over the coming years.”

Admiral Sir George Zambellas, First Sea Lord, said: “The Royal Navy has been  operating continuous at-sea deterrent patrols for more than 40 years and the  Successor submarines will allow us to do so with cutting-edge equipment well  into the future.”

Both contracts, one of £47 million and another of £32 million, will be filled  by workers in Barrow-in-Furness, Cumbria.

The Ministry of Defence said the total number of MoD and industrial staff  currently working on the Successor programme is around 2,000, with more than  half working as engineers  and designers.

More than 850 potential UK suppliers have so far been identified as  benefiting from investment in the programme and as many as 6,000 people will be  involved by the time that the construction reaches a peak.

Source – Western Morning News

Royal Navy – Northrop delivers program management system gear

NEW MALDEN, England, Sept. 10 – A final  batch of platform management system (PMS) hardware has been delivered to BAE  Systems by Northrop Grumman for installation on a Royal Navy submarine.

“Northrop Grumman has a well-established relationship with the Royal Navy,  supplying and supporting systems for surface ships and submarines,” said Andrew  Tyler, Northrop Grumman’s chief executive, U.K. and Europe. “The continued  success of our involvement in the Astute program is a reflection of the skill of  our teams and the close partnership that we have with BAE Systems and the  Ministry of Defense.”

The platform management systems controls and monitors a submarine’s platform  machinery and onboard systems. Northrop Grumman’s Sperry Marine business unit  supplied the PMS to BAE Systems Maritime–Submarines under a performance  partnership arrangement. The PMS delivered will be installed on Astute Boat 5,  the Anson.

Additionally, Northrop Grumman is currently under contract to supply PMS  hardware and software for two additional Astute-class, nuclear-powered  submarines.

“Our extensive track record of delivering reliable, high-performance  navigation and ship control solutions has helped to establish us as a preferred  supplier for Royal Navy platforms,” said Alan Dix, managing director of Northrop  Grumman Sperry Marine. “We are particularly pleased that we have achieved 100  percent on-time delivery status during the two-year process for Astute Boat  5.”

Source – UPI.com

 

HMS Artful – Quay concerns delay launch of navy submarine

Nuclear safety watchdog bars launch of reactor-driven HMS Artful due to doubts about structural integrity of Barrow quay

HMS Astute

HMS Artful’s sister submarine Astute at the BAE Systems shipyard in Barrow-in-Furness.

The nuclear safety watchdog has blocked the launch of the Royal Navy’s newest reactor-driven submarine because of a risk that a dockside could collapse.

The Office for Nuclear Regulation (ONR) has barred the launch of HMS Artful, the third of Britain’s Astute-class hunter-killer submarines, because of doubts about the structural integrity of the wet dock quay at Barrow-in-Furness, Cumbria.

The submarine’s manufacturer, BAE Systems, had previously planned for a launch this year but now says it will be early next year. It said the problem with the dock would not cause further delays.

ONR raised its concerns in its quarterly report on the Barrow shipyard covering April to June 2013. It has ordered BAE Systems, as the site licensee, to investigate and report back on whether the dock was safe to use. “ONR placed a hold point on the launch of the next Astute-class submarine which will only be removed once the licensee can address and justify the continued use of the aging wet dock quay,” the report says.

According to ONR, the quay is used to help commission the Astute-class submarines. “Recent surveys have indicated that there may be some deterioration in its structure,” said an ONR spokeswoman. “As a result, the safety justification for use of this facility is being reviewed by BAE Systems to ensure that it remains valid. Until BAE Systems’ investigations have been completed, ONR cannot say whether there will need to be a major programme of work. However, in the interim, ONR has placed a hold on launch of the next submarine so that we will have to be satisfied that the structure remains fit for purpose.”

In a report about a visit to the Barrow yard by the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge in April, BAE Systems said Artful was due for launch this year. The first two submarines in the much-delayed £9.75bn fleet, HMS Astute and HMS Ambush, are at sea and another four are still being built.

A spokesperson for BAE Systems said: “We do not expect this to delay the launch of the next Astute-class submarine, which is scheduled for early next year. As always, if any work is required to the wet dock quay, safety will be a priority.”

Peter Burt, of the Nuclear Information Service, which monitors military activities, pointed out that much of Britain’s nuclear infrastructure was decades old. “It’s showing its age,” he said. “Hundreds of millions of pounds are being spent in secret each year as the Ministry of Defence struggles to bring ageing facilities up to modern safety standards, adding even more to the already enormous costs of the Trident replacement and Astute submarine programmes.”

Source –The Guardian

UK – Work starts on sixth Astute submarine at Barrow

Agamemnon keel

The keel is the first part of a submarine to be built

A ceremony has been held at a Cumbrian shipyard to mark the start of work on the sixth of a fleet of seven new submarines for the Royal Navy.

The Astute-class vessel – a nuclear-powered attack submarine – is being built at BAE Systems in Barrow.

It has been officially named Agamemnon after the Greek mythological King, though it has not yet been constructed.

A keel laying ceremony took place at Devonshire Dock Hall.

Defence Equipment Minister Philip Dunne attended the ceremony and revealed the Ministry of Defence (MoD) had signed a new contract with BAE Systems.

The Barrow yard has been working on the Astute programme since 2001.

The other submarines are HMS Astute, Ambush, Artful, Audacious and Anson. The seventh will be named HMS Ajax.

Hard to detect

The keel for the first vessel – HMS Astute – was laid in January 2001 and the craft was launched in June 2007.

Mr Dunne said: “The keel-laying of Agamemnon and the handover of HMS Astute and HMS Ambush to the Royal Navy are huge milestones, reflecting significant progress in the programme.

“By ensuring the UK’s submarine programme remains affordable, this new contract will help deliver the Astute Class and secure around 5,000 jobs at BAE Systems and thousands more in over 400 suppliers across the UK submarine supply chain.”

The fleet of submarines will be based at Faslane in Scotland.

The Astute Class of vessels have greater firepower, state-of-the-art communications equipment and advanced stealth technology, making them quiet and harder to detect, according to the MoD.

Source – BBC News

UK – MPs back submarine building in Barrow

Workers at Barrow’s BAE Systems plant in front of an Astute class submarine

MPs and members of the House of Lords met to show their support for the UK’s submarine building industry, a key employer in the North West.

Politicians met with key figures in the industry and representatives of the supply chain and trade unions, who wanted to illustrate the chain of jobs that sten form submarine construction in areas like Barrow.

The event was supported by BAE Systems and the Keep Our Future Afloat Campaign, a trade union organisation which campaigns to keep high-tech jobs in the North West and across the UK.

Philip Dunne MP, minister for defence equipment, and Rt Hon Jim Murphy MP, Labour’s shadow secretary of state, were among those who spoke at the event to show their strong support for Britain’s submarine-based nuclear deterrent.

All the speakers paid tribute to the cutting edge work of the firms forming the supply chain for the Astute-class submarines, currently under construction in Barrow, and stressed the importance for these firms of the Vanguard replacement programme.

John Woodcock, MP for Barrow and Furness, who hosted the event said:

“It was fantastic to see so many MPs and peers from every corner of the country and all political parties coming to meet representatives of the firms and workers who form the supply chain for Britain’s cutting edge submarines. They will have been left in no doubt of the importance of the submarine programme to supporting British manufacturing and rebalancing the economy, as well as to securing Britain’s security – I hope they will bear this in mind when the time comes in 2016 to make a decision on renewing our at-sea nuclear deterrent.

“I am particularly grateful for the strong political support given to the submarine programme by government and opposition frontbenchers, Philip Dunne and Jim Murphy, in their speeches – the 1,200 firms in the supply chain will have taken heart from what they both said.”

Source – ITV News

Submarine deal secures future for hundreds of Glasgow jobs

 IT IS taller than a Glasgow tenement and packs more punch than the late Gorbals-born world flyweight boxing champion Benny Lynch ever did.

The latest structure completed by Clyde shipbuilders

The latest structure completed by Clyde shipbuilders

The latest structure completed by Clyde shipbuilders

BAE Systems Clyde shipbuilders unveiled its latest engineering fete – a man-made island of steel which will tower over Britain’s newest aircraft carrier.

The Aft Island unit is 31m tall.

It is the tallest structure ever to be built at the Scotstoun warship yard and is the maritime equivalent of an air traffic control tower.

A flight commander will take charge of the hand picked personnel who will manage the fighter jets and helicopters which will fly from the new carrier.

The Ministry of Defence has yet to release details of the number of staff who will be on operational duty on ‘the island’ when the nation’s biggest warship goes into action.

But it is thought the on-board controllers could be responsible for up to 40 fighter jets, though the average number is likely to be 12.

The towering steel structure comprises nine decks, which include sleeping accommodation and a briefing room for pilots.

Once completed, it will bristle with radar and antenna.

It will also be used by a sailor to steer the massive carrier, under instruction from the ship’s captain who will be located elsewhere on the vessel.

The latest carrier block to be manufactured by Scotstoun and workers at the sister Govan yard is 32 metres long and unlike any ship ever seen on the Clyde.

Project head Derek McCaffrey, from Stewarton, East Ayrshire, said: “It’s shape dictates its radar signature. The smaller the signature the safer the crew from enemy attack.”

From the first steel cut in January last year it has taken 86 weeks to build the unit. It will be loaded and welded on to a barge in less than two weeks time before taken around Scotland’s northern coastline to Rosyth, where the super sized carrier – being built in sections at yards across the UK – is being put together like a giant metal jigsaw.

The Aft Island is the most intricate and most advanced block produced so far on the Clyde for the multi-billion pound carrier programme and the workmanship has impressed Systems Into Service Director Steven Carroll.

He is responsible for the delivery of both carriers – the Prince of Wales is the second of the fleet.

From the tradesmen at Scotstoun to the yard’s own specialist design engineers, he saluted them all when he said: “They have done a fantastic job.

“It was a 90-week programme but they managed to complete four weeks earlier than scheduled, which is all to their credit.”

 

Govan-based Thales Optronics is to help support the Royal Navy’s fleet of submarines as part of 10-year deal with the Ministry of Defence.

The deal will see the French-owned defence contractor manage the visual systems fitted on every Royal Navy submarine including the periscopes for the four Vanguard nuclear ballistic missile subs which form Britain’s so called nuclear deterrent as well as the five nuclear-powered Trafalgar fleet.

The contract will also see Thales maintain optronic masts fitted on the Navy’s new of Astute nuclear-driven subs.

Thales UK chief executive Victor Chavez, said: “This contract reinforces our positive well-established relationship with the Royal Navy.”

And Philip Dunne, Minister for Defence Equipment, Support and Technology, said said the new long term contract was good for the MoD and Thales.

He added: “Not only will it secure a number of jobs across the UK while delivering savings but will also provide essential support for the combat equipment that helps give the Royal Navy’s fleet of ships and submarines a vital technological edge wherever they are based in the world.”

The latest bumper contract comes almost exactly two years after Thales Optronics won the Queen’s Award for Enterprise after selling more than £100m of military equipment to foreign buyers over a 36-month period.

The defence manufacturer which specialises in optronic based products including hi-tech binoculars used by frontline soldiers as well as laser rangefinders and infra-red thermal cameras was previously known as Barr & Stroud Ltd.

It was a leading Scots engineering company launched 125 years ago in Glasgow and is now located in custom built premises in Linthouse Road.

News of the £600m deal comes as BAE Systems Clyde shipbuilders unveiled its latest engineering fete – a man-made island of steel which will tower over Britain’s newest aircraft carrier.

The Aft Island unit is 31m tall. It is the tallest structure ever to be built at the Scotstoun warship yard and is the maritime equivalent of an air traffic control tower.

A flight commander will take charge of the hand picked personnel who will manage the fighter jets and helicopters which will fly from the new carrier.

The Ministry of Defence has yet to release details of the number of staff who will be on operational duty on ‘the island’ when the nation’s biggest warship goes into action.

But it is thought the on-board controllers could be responsible for up to 40 fighter jets, though the average number is likely to be 12.

The latest carrier block to be manufactured by Scotstoun and workers at the sister Govan yard is 32m long and unlike any ship ever seen on the Clyde.

Project head Derek McCaffrey, from Stewarton, East Ayrshire, said: “It’s shape dictates its radar signature. The smaller the signature the safer the crew from enemy attack.”

From the first steel cut in January last year it has taken 86 weeks to build the unit. It will be loaded and welded on to a barge in less than two weeks time before taken around Scotland’s northern coastline to Rosyth, where the super sized carrier – being built in sections at yards across the UK – is being put together like a giant metal jigsaw.

Source – Evening Times