Tag Archives: Submarines

Sailing into the history books: the Navy’s first women submariners: Trio complete months of training to earn their ‘Dolphins’


  • First females in the 110-year history of the Navy’s Submarine Service
  • Ban on women serving in submarines lifted in December 2011
  • During training the three women conducted operations on nuclear-powered Vanguard-class submarine HMS Vigilant
  • ‘Dolphin’ is the name give to the clasp worn by qualified submariners

Three women have made history by becoming the first female submariners to serve in the Royal Navy.

Lieutenants Maxine Stiles, Alexandra Olsson and Penny Thackray have completed months of specialised training to earn their ‘Dolphins’ – the clasp worn by qualified submariners – becoming the first women in the 110-year history of the Navy’s Submarine Service.

For years women were unable to serve on submarines because of possible health risks but, after an independent review found that only pregnant women should not serve, Philip Hammond, the defence secretary, lifted the ban in December 2011.

Lieutenants Maxine Stiles, Alexandra Olsson and Penny Thackray (left-right) have made history by becoming the first female submariners to serve in the Royal Navy

Lieutenants Maxine Stiles, Alexandra Olsson and Penny Thackray (left-right) have made history by becoming the first female submariners to serve in the Royal Navy

Today, Mr Hammond said: ‘This is not only a huge personal achievement for these three outstanding officers, as they take up their new roles supporting the ultimate safeguard of our national security, but also an historic moment for the Royal Navy and our armed forces.’

Following the arrival of woman officers, female ratings (non-commissioned personnel) will start training later this year with a view to serving on Vanguard submarines in 2015.

Female personnel will also be able to serve on Astute-class submarines from around 2016.

Ring ring goes the bell: After 110 years of the Silent Service, pioneering Lieutenants Maxine Stiles, Alex Olsson and Penny Thackray have become the first women to serve onboard a Vanguard class submarine

Ring ring goes the bell: After 110 years of the Silent Service, pioneering Lieutenants Maxine Stiles, Alex Olsson and Penny Thackray have become the first women to serve onboard a Vanguard class submarine

During their training, previously only undertaken by men, the three women officers conducted operations on nuclear-powered Vanguard-class submarine HMS Vigilant, passing their rigorous final exams with flying colours, and will now embark on careers in the Submarine Service.

Lt Stiles, from Ashton-under-Lyne, Greater Manchester, said: ‘I wanted to be able to say that I had made the most of every opportunity that I had been given in the Navy.

‘It’s very intense and very challenging but that’s what makes it so rewarding. At the end of it, when you get your Dolphins and are accepted into the submarine community, it’s great.’

Describing the reception from the 165 male members of the 168-member crew, the 29-year-old, who has been in the Navy for four years, said: ‘As long as you can do your job and you’re good at what you do, I don’t think they cared whether you were male or female.’

HMS Vigilant's (pictured) commanding officer Commander Matt Dennis, who oversaw the training, said: 'I was impressed with how seamlessly the three women integrated on board'

HMS Vigilant’s (pictured) commanding officer Commander Matt Dennis, who oversaw the training, said: ‘I was impressed with how seamlessly the three women integrated on board’

A life under the ocean wave: Lieutenants Maxine Stiles, Alexandra Olsson and Penny Thackray (left-right) have completed months of specialised training to earn their 'Dolphins' - the clasp worn by qualified submariners

A life under the ocean wave: Lieutenants Maxine Stiles, Alexandra Olsson and Penny Thackray (left-right) have completed months of specialised training to earn their ‘Dolphins’ – the clasp worn by qualified submariners

Ever vigilant: Lt Penny Thackray, 39, from Hightown in West Yorkshire, will become an education oficer

Ever vigilant: Lt Penny Thackray, 39, from Hightown in West Yorkshire, will become an education oficer

Lt Olsson, 26, from Tranmere, the Wirral, was inspired to volunteer to serve on submarines after childhood visits to see HMS Onyx at the Maritime Museum in Birkenhead.

She said: ‘I kept volunteering and volunteering until it came in.’

She admitted that the three women might have ‘stuck out’ on board, but said: ‘They were really receptive. Having a slower process of introducing a few females first in the officer cadre and then ratings has helped. We haven’t just knocked on the door of a submarine and said ‘Can we come to sea please?’

‘I felt like a little sister to 165 brothers. You live as a very strange family. Once we got qualified they were glad for us the same way they had been glad for hundreds of submariners before.

‘At the end of the day manpower is a big thing for the Navy – as long as you can do the job, it doesn’t matter.’

Maxine Stiles will serve aboard HMS Vigilant as a logistics officer

Maxine Stiles will serve aboard HMS Vigilant as a logistics officer

 She added: ‘We did a long patrol, we’ve come across most things people want to know about, like how you live and how the guys get on with you.

‘I know there’s people who are interested but they haven’t been able to make an informed decision.

‘Of course it’s been challenging, but women are absolutely capable of doing this job. I think that change can always be a bit of a shock, but I look forward to seeing more and more women getting on board.’

Describing the living conditions on board, she said: ‘It’s slightly more cramped that you would be used to.

Actually you bring your perspective in so you don’t see the lack of space anymore – you see the space that’s there.

‘It’s a bit of an odd place to live – everything smells the same, it all has this diesel oily smell which you have to get used to. But it’s not a horrible place to live.

Always a rover: Lt Olsson, 26, from Tranmere, the Wirral, was inspired to volunteer to serve on submarines after childhood visits to see HMS Onyx at the Maritime Museum in Birkenhead

Always a rover: Lt Olsson, 26, from Tranmere, the Wirral, was inspired to volunteer to serve on submarines after childhood visits to see HMS Onyx at the Maritime Museum in Birkenhead

 ‘I managed to have a shower every day, we had laundry facilities. There was gym equipment. And food becomes a massive part of your day, it’s a routine you get into.’

Lt Thackray, 39, from Hightown in West Yorkshire, said: ‘You limit your horizons. I found I just forgot about the existence of some things – someone asked me if I missed bananas. I hadn’t even noticed until they mentioned it. I just forgot the outside world, you get a whole new world.’

After their training, Lt Stiles will continue her logistics officer post on board; Lt Olsson is undertaking deputy weapons engineering officer training; and Lt Thackray will become an education officer.

HMS Vigilant’s commanding officer Commander Matt Dennis, who oversaw their training, said: ‘I was impressed with how seamlessly the three women integrated on board.

‘They qualified without any difficulty and two of them even completed additional training whilst at sea.

‘As I would expect, they were accepted as integral members of the ship’s company by the rest of the crew and have really paved the way for women on submarines to be business as usual from now on.’

Second Sea Lord Vice Admiral David Steel said: ‘Women have been serving in ships at sea with the Royal Navy for more than 20 years and integrating them into the Submarine Service completes their inclusion into all seagoing branches.

‘This is a proud day for the Royal Navy but equally a major personal achievement for these three officers, as it is for all those qualifying.’

Source – Daily Mail.

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Revealed: Shock ‘Code Red’ safety report on British nuclear subs as fleet is hit by leaking, cracked reactors and lack of trained staff

  • Safety issues with UK’s nuclear subs and facilities used to repair missiles
  • Cracks in reactors and nuclear discharges found in Navy’s oldest boats
  • Nuclear-qualified engineers are quitting over poor pay and conditions
  • Experts described latest report as the most worrying they had seen

 

An official watchdog discovered major safety issues with both the UK’s nuclear-powered submarines and facilities used to repair nuclear missiles, raising the risk of a catastrophic accident involving radioactive material.

Last night, experts described the Defence Nuclear Safety Regulator (DNSR) report for 2012-13 as the most worrying they had seen.

Leak: Tireless, the oldest submarine in the Royal Navy fleet, which entered service in 1984, suffered damage to its circuits earlier this year resulting in a radioactive leakCode Red: Tireless, the oldest submarine in the Royal Navy fleet, which entered service in 1984, suffered damage to its circuits earlier this year resulting in a radioactive leak

The document, obtained by this newspaper, reveals:

  • Cracks in reactors and nuclear discharges are directly attributable to the Royal Navy’s oldest Trafalgar Class SSNs (Ship Submarine Nuclear) remaining in service beyond their design date.
  • Faults with the new Astute Class submarines will delay their entry into service, forcing the Navy to continue sailing the ageing and potentially dangerous Trafalgars.
  • The Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE) failed to notice or rectify corrosion to a nuclear missile treatment plant in Berkshire.
  • Nuclear-qualified engineers are quitting the Navy in droves over poor pay and conditions, creating a skills crisis.

Head of the DNSR Dr Richard Savage wrote: ‘Significant and sustained attention is required to ensure maintenance of adequate safety performance and the rating [Red] reflects the potential impact if changes are ill-conceived or implemented.

 ‘The inability to sustain a sufficient number of nuclear suitably competent personnel is the principal threat to safety. Vulnerabilities exist in core skill areas, including safety, propulsion, power and naval architects.

HMS TIRELESS THE ‘KILLER SUB’

Two Submariners killed in an explosion aboard the HMS Tireless, 32-year-old Paul McCann (left) and 20-year-old Anthony HuntrodIn March 2007, sailors Anthony Huntrod, 20, (right) and Paul McCann, 32, (left)  were killed on HMS Tireless when a self-contained oxygen generator exploded during an Arctic exercise north of Alaska.

They died trapped in a small, smoke-filled compartment.

An inquest heard that there was a significant possibility the generator was salvaged from a hazardous waste depot in a cost-cutting bid  by the MoD.

‘Due to build delays with the Astute Class, there has been a requirement to extend the Trafalgar Class beyond their original design life in order to maintain the SSN flotilla at a fully operational level.

Some of the emergent technical issues affecting the Trafalgar Class over the last few years can be directly attributed to the effects of plant ageing.’

The report also raises concerns over whether the UK’s nuclear fleet and its inland nuclear establishments could withstand an earthquake on the same scale as the one that struck the Fukushima reactor plant in  Japan in 2011.

The document notes that facilities which form part of Britain’s Defence Nuclear Programme (DNP) require ‘continued priority attention’ to reach recommended safety standards.

Last night, nuclear expert John Large told The Mail on Sunday that the DNSR report revealed a crisis in Royal Navy nuclear safety.

He said: ‘This is the most self-damning and concerning report that I have seen. We’re talking about a ticking time-bomb, with a higher risk to the public and the environment than we previously feared.

‘The combination of a lack of nuclear engineers, the Astute submarines being so far behind schedule and the Trafalgar Class sailing beyond their design date is very worrying.

‘The Trafalgars, including HMS Tireless, the oldest boat of the class, should be withdrawn immediately.’

HMS Tireless, which entered service in 1984, suffered damage to  its circuits earlier this year resulting in a radioactive leak.

The nuclear sub was patrolling off South-West England when the problem arose, forcing its captain to return to Devonport. A more serious leak  was avoided because of swift remedial action.

Nuclear materials – including Trident missiles – are brought to the AWE’s site at Aldermaston, Berkshire, for assembly, maintenance and decommissioning.

Warning: There are also fears over the Aldermaston centre where Trident missiles are servicedWarning: There are also fears over the Aldermaston centre where Trident missiles are serviced

These processes include ‘uranium polishing’ – the removal of impurities from the material in order to extend its life cycle as a component in nuclear missiles.

The DNSR report states: ‘Inspection programmes have not been as comprehensive as regulators would expect.

As an example, corrosion in the structural supports of a building was not identified as early as would be expected which resulted in the Office for Nuclear Regulation issuing a Safety Improvement Notice.’

Last night the AWE admitted corrosion had affected its uranium component manufacturing facility, but added repairs had been completed.

An MoD spokesman said: ‘We would not operate any submarine unless it was safe to do so and this report acknowledges that we are taking  the necessary action to effectively manage the technical issues raised by the regulator.

‘It also highlights that the MoD is committed to maintaining expertise in submarine technology and operation – underlined by last month’s operational handover of the first two Astute Class submarines.’

Source – Daily Mail

Tangled in red tape, India’s submarine fleet sinking

 
Tangled in red tape, India's submarine fleet sinking
The Indian Navy is making do with just 14 aging conventional diesel-electric submarines.
NEW DELHI: The navy’s desperate attempts to rescue its sinking underwater combat arm have been dealt a double whammy. First, the ongoing project to construct six Scorpene submarines has been delayed by another 14-18 months, with the first vessel now slated to roll out of Mazagon Dock Limited(MDL) by November 2016 at the earliest.More worryingly, the new project to construct six advanced stealth submarines, armed with both land-attack missile capabilities and air-independent propulsion for greater underwater endurance, is still stuck in political apathy and bureaucratic red-tape. It has already been examined by three committees after being granted “acceptance of necessity” in November 2007.

The finance ministry has now again returned the file for the over Rs 50,000-crore project, code-named Project-75India, to the defence ministry for clarifications.

“The draft Cabinet Committee on Security (CCS) note for P-75I is simply being tossed around with no resolution in sight. The global tender or RFP (request for proposal) for it can be issued only after the CCS approves the file,” said a source.

Even if the P-75I tender is floated today, it will take at least three years to ink the contract with the selected foreign collaborator, and another seven to eight years after that for the first submarine to be built.

With the over Rs 23,000 crore Scorpene (P-75) project already running four years behind the original 2012-17 induction schedule, alarms bells are now ringing. The navy is making do with just 14 aging conventional diesel-electric submarines — 10 Russian Kilo-class and four German HDW ones — which are to be progressively retired in the coming years despite life-extension refits. China and Pakistan, meanwhile, are adding muscle to their underwater combat fleets.

Way back in 1999, the CCS approved a 30-year submarine-building plan, which envisaged induction of 12 new submarines by 2012, followed by another dozen by 2030. But the government’s inability to plan and take decisions means the navy is yet to get a single submarine 14 years later.

P-75I is embroiled in a debate over the “selection of Indian shipyards” and the “indigenization level to be achieved”. While two submarines are to be imported, four will be constructed in India.

The navy wants private shipyards to be involved in the project to save time since MDL is overburdened with orders. But the MoD’s defence production department has insisted that three will be built at MDL in Mumbai and one at Hindustan Shipyard in Visakhapatnam.

The Scorpene project, with contracts being inked with French firms in October 2005 has been grossly mismanaged, with huge time and cost overruns. The deal for the ‘MDL procured material packages’, including sensors, propulsion and the likes, with the French firms was signed only last December. The order for heavy-weight torpedoes to arm the submarines is also yet to be placed.

Projections show only five to six of the present 14 Indian submarines will be fully operational by 2020. Even with a few Scorpenes by then, India will remain far short of the minimum 18 conventional submarines required to deter Pakistan and China.

Source – Times of India

There’s nothing sadder than the wreck of a once-great submarine

There's nothing sadder than the wreck of a once-great submarine

They dove beneath the waves, and helped to win massive global wars. But submarines can’t submerge forever. Eventually, these old warhorses get swept away by history. Here are some images of the most haunting dead submarines of all time.

Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, May 17 1993

There's nothing sadder than the wreck of a once-great submarine

One submarine tender and 16 nuclear submarines are awaiting scrapping.

The remains of two XT-Craft midget submarines, Aberlady Bay, Scotland, UK

There's nothing sadder than the wreck of a once-great submarine

The XT-Craft submarines are the training versions of the X-Craft that attacked the Battleship Tirpitz in September 1943. Two of these vessels were transported to Aberlady Bay and used for target practice and gun tests by Royal Air Force aircraft.

There's nothing sadder than the wreck of a once-great submarine

There's nothing sadder than the wreck of a once-great submarine

There's nothing sadder than the wreck of a once-great submarine

There's nothing sadder than the wreck of a once-great submarine

Near the Russian naval base of Olenya Bay, Kola Peninsula, Russia

There's nothing sadder than the wreck of a once-great submarine Continue reading

The Global Submarine Market 2013-2023 – Report

Reportlinker.com announces that a new market research report is available in its catalogue:
The Global Submarine Market 2013-2023

http://www.reportlinker.com/p01158672/The-Global-Submarine-Market-2013-2023.html#utm_source=prnewswire&utm_medium=pr&utm_campaign=Aerospace_and_Defense

Product Synopsis This report is the result of SDI’s extensive market and company research covering the global Submarine industry. It provides detailed analysis of both historic and forecast global industry values, factors influencing demand, the challenges faced by industry participants, analysis of the leading companies in the industry, and key news.
Introduction and Landscape Why was the report written? “The Global Submarine Market 2013-2023” offers the reader detailed analysis of the global Submarine market over the next ten years, alongside potential market opportunities to enter the industry, using detailed market size forecasts.
What are the key drivers behind recent market changes? In 2013 the global submarine market is estimated to value US$14.4 billion and is expected to grow to US$21.7 billion by 2023, representing a CAGR of 4.2% during the forecast period. The market consists of three categories: SSN, SSBN and SSK. The global expenditure on SSNs is expected to account for a major share of approximately 41% during the forecast period. The remaining expenditure is accounted for by SSBN and SSK with shares of 33% and 26% respectively.
What makes this report unique and essential to read? “The Global Submarine Market 2013-2023” provides detailed analysis of the current industry size and growth expectations from 2013 to 2023, including highlights of key growth stimulators. It also benchmarks the industry against key global markets and provides a detailed understanding of emerging opportunities in specific areas.
Key Features and Benefits The report provides detailed analysis of the market for submarines during 2013-2023, including the factors that influence why countries are investing or cutting defense expenditure. It provides detailed expectations of growth rates and projected total expenditure.
Navantia, Fincantieri, DCNS, Kockums, BAE Systems, Mazagon Docks, Hyundai Heavy Industries, Daewoo Shipbuilding and Marine Engineering, PO Sevmash, Huntington Ingalls Industries, General Dynamics Electric Boat Limited, Admiralty Shipyards, ThyssenkKrupp Marine Systems, ASC, Golcuk Naval Shipyard, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Kawasaki Shipbuilding Corporation, SaaB, Thales, Lockheed Martin
A significant number of countries such as the US, the UK, Germany, France, and India are currently in the process of replacing their existing fleet of submarines. Most of these submarines are being retired as they have reached the end of their operational cycle. Additionally, Soviet era submarines currently in use by countries such as Russia, India, and China need to be replaced. The demand for modern submarines creates a lucrative opportunity for suppliers across the world.
Key Market Issues The market for submarines in the Western world drastically reduced after the end of the Cold War and those possessing substantial submarine building capabilities are virtually self-sufficient in this regard. However BRIC countries and the developing economies of Southeast Asia are becoming financially able to fund a cost consuming submarine capability. China, with its anti-access strategy and its claim to the South China Sea, and North Korea, with its belligerent attitude, have triggered the demand for submarines in the Far East. Regional rivalries among countries such as India and Pakistan, and Greece and Turkey, and the push for general modernization are seen as drivers for the submarine market worldwide.
The global submarine industry requires skilled labor to design submarines and provide maintenance and upgrades throughout its operational life. However, budget cuts have led to a shortage of skilled professionals such as reactor engineers and scientists, causing a resource crunch within the industry. The UK’s submarine industry is currently facing a 14% shortage of civilian safety experts and a 7% shortage of submarine reactor engineers, largely due to a lack of defense budget allocation.
Key Highlights A submarine that draws power by onboard nuclear reactors has a nearly boundless range and advanced maneuverability. The submarine can be positioned in distant waters across the globe with no need to surface except for crew provisions every three months or so. Therefore, the innovation of the nuclear reactor is serving at least six international navies: the US, Russia, the UK, France, China, and India, all of which possess nuclear submarines.
The decreased demand for submarines in the West and the increasing number of technologically advanced sub-systems included in these vessels means that no single industry would be able to develop and sustain a submarine manufacturing base. This has gradually resulted in consolidation in the industry. There is also increasing collaboration on joint development and production activities amongst firms. For example American firms Huntington Ingalls Shipbuilding and General Dynamics Electric Boat jointly produce the Virginia-class submarines.

Table of Contents
1 Introduction 1.1 What is this Report About? 1.2 Definitions 1.3 Summary Methodology 1.4 Continue reading

US – Women eager to join ‘brotherhood’ on Navy’s fast-attack submarines

Concerns arise about need for costly onboard changes

Navy Lt. j.g. Marquette Leveque, 25, found a “professional working environment” as one of the first female officers to train on guided- and ballistic-missile subs. (U.S. Navy photograph)

Life aboard a fast-attack submarine can be rough: Quarters are cramped,  operations are hectic and privacy is just a memory, veteran submariners say.

But as the Navy prepares to assign women to  fast-attack subs, one of its first female submariners is relishing the challenge  of serving in the “dolphin brotherhood.”

Lt. j.g. Marquette Leveque, 25, said  that serving with two other women and 150 men undersea for six months was  basically a “nonevent.”

“The biggest change I think was [the men] just getting used to female voices  around, and I mean that in a very positive way,” said Lt.  Leveque, a native of Fort Collins, Colo.

Still, other big changes — and challenges — lie on the horizon.

Women have been permitted to serve on guided-missile submarines such as the USS Ohio since 2009. Now they will be able to serve on smaller submarines used for surveillance, reconnaissance and intelligence-gathering. (U.S. Navy photograph)

The Navy, which decided to allow women to serve  on guided- and ballistic-missile submarines in 2009, announced in January that  female sailors would be permitted to deploy on fast-attack submarines, as the Pentagon lifted its ban on women in direct ground  combat jobs.

Lt. Leveque is one of the first 24  female officers selected to train on guided- and ballistic-missile submarines,  which generally avoid contact with other ships and are tasked with conducting  nuclear counterattacks.

Fast-attack subs carry out intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance  missions; insert special operations forces into sensitive areas; lay mines; and  attack enemy ships and ground targets. From 350 feet to 370 feet long and 33  feet to 40 feet wide, they are about 200 feet shorter and 10 feet narrower than  their missile-laden cousins and carry crews of 140 — about 20 fewer personnel  than guided- and ballistic-missile subs.

‘No room to expand’

The Navy has four guided-missile and 14  ballistic-missile subs, and 54 fast-attack subs.

One reason for the Navy’s ban was the “prohibitive” cost of retrofitting sleeping and bathroom facilities on such  small vessels. No retrofitting was needed for guided- and ballistic-missile  subs, which provide staterooms that female officers share and bathrooms with  changeable signs indicating which sex is inside. Enlisted female sailors, whose  bunks provide little privacy, eventually will be assigned to fast-attack subs,  officials say.

Facilities on fast-attack subs are less spacious, and there is “virtually no  room to expand anything on these tightly packed boats,” said retired Rear Adm. Edward S. “Skip” McGinley II,  who has served on the smaller, stealthier vessels. He said part of the subs’ bunk spaces probably would have to be cordoned off to accommodate enlisted  women.

Navy Lt. j.g. Marquette Leveque, 25, found a "professional working environment" as one of the first female officers to train on guided- and ballistic-missile subs. (U.S. Navy photograph)

“That involves not just moving around [walls] and doors in quarters which are  already extremely cramped, but also doing some significant plumbing  rearrangements to establish separate sanitary facilities in a ship that is  already a plumbing nightmare,” Adm. McGinley said. “This, in my humble  opinion, may be the most expensive and difficult engineering problem to solve in  this project.”

Rob Fisher, another veteran submariner, said: “Separate areas will be very  difficult to do. Segregation of the area could be arranged, but travel-through  areas for the opposite sex will be necessary.

“I believe that women can be great submariners, but the older subs were not  built with privacy in mind.”

During a recent news conference, a senior Navy  official speaking on background said that assigning women to fast-attack subs  would incur costs, but he did not elaborate.

“Lots of plans are being discussed and [it’s] too early to tell,” said Cmdr.  Monica Rousselow, a Navy spokeswoman.

Fraternization

Other concerns include fraternization and pregnancy, especially when a  submarine might be unable to surface.

“The fraternization potential, in my opinion, would be very high.  The  fast-attack lifestyle is extremely cramped and would really need mature  personnel and leadership to enable female members to serve successfully,” former  submariner Brian Penders said, adding that fraternization on a fast-attack  vessel probably would not exceed that on larger subs or surface ships.

The Navy said it does not track data on  male-female fraternization.

According to a January report in Stars and Stripes, a recent Navy  survey found that nearly three-quarters of sailor pregnancies are unplanned. Of  those, only 31 percent were using birth control at the time of conception.

Traces of carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and other gases in a submarine  could harm a developing child in the earliest weeks of pregnancy, when a sailor  might not know she is pregnant, said Elaine Donnelly, president of the Center  for Military Readiness and a staunch critic of women in combat roles.

Dr. Hugh Scott, a retired Navy  rear admiral, said the levels of carbon dioxide in a submerged submarine are 10  times higher that those in the open atmosphere and could damage the brain of a  fetus. He said he has called for Navy studies on the  impact of prolonged exposure on women’s fertility, bone health and developing  fetuses, but none has been conducted. Dr.  Scott served in the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations from 1992 to  1994 as director of the Medical Resources and Plans and Policy divisions.

Lt. Leveque, who is married to a  fellow submariner, said fraternization will not be a problem.

“Honestly, it’s a very professional working environment, and that doesn’t  change when we go [from port] to sea at all,” said Lt.  Leveque, one of the first three women to earn the submarine warfare officer “dolphins” pin, after nearly two years of training and a deployment aboard the  ballistic-missile sub USS Wyoming, based in Kings Bay, Ga.

She is backed by at least two other female Navy  pioneers — retired Capt. Lory Manning, who was one of the first women to serve  on a surface ship, and Capt. Joellen Oslund, one of the first six women accepted  into Navy flight school in 1972 and the Navy’s  first female helicopter pilot.

“I think [the military] threw up a lot of artificial barriers that have  finally come down, and I expect the women will do fine in submarines,” Capt.  Oslund said.

“It’s where every submariner wants to go,” Capt. Manning said. “The other  [submarines] just sort of sit out there and wait for the balloon to go up.  [A  fast-attack sub is] where every submarine admiral has to spend time.”

Source – Washinigton Post

Rolls-Royce begins work on new Raynesway factory to build reactors for submarines

WORK has officially started on Rolls-Royce’s new submarine reactor factory.

Yesterday, Vice Admiral Sir Andrew Mathews, the Royal Navy’s chief of fleet, conducted a ground-breaking ceremony at the company’s marine power site in Raynesway.

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The multi-million-pound Core Manufacturing Facility will replace existing production buildings at the site. It will produce reactor fuel cores for UK submarines and will support 300 Derby jobs.

Vice Admiral Sir Andrew Mathews leads the ground-breaking ceremony at the site of the new Rolls-Royce factory that will build reactors for the UK sub fleet.

Vice Admiral Sir Andrew Mathews leads the ground-breaking ceremony at the site of the new Rolls-Royce factory that will build reactors for the UK sub fleet.

The building is part of a phased revamp of the Raynesway site, which will take place over the next decade.

Sir Andrew said: “Rolls-Royce has played a vital role in supporting the Royal Navy’s nuclear submarine propulsion programme for over 50 years.

“This significant investment to regenerate the facility, to build our nuclear reactor cores, will ensure that the site continues to do so for decades to come.”

Jason Smith, president of submarines and chief operating officer for nuclear, said: “We are pleased to begin construction of this important facility, which will use the most advanced manufacturing techniques to enhance our world-leading nuclear manufacturing capability.

“The investment in this facility demonstrates the high level of trust that the Ministry of Defence has in both our technology and the expertise of our highly skilled workforce.”

Rolls-Royce is investing £500 million to regenerate its Raynesway site after striking a huge £1.1 billion deal last year to build submarine reactors for the MoD.

A further £600 million is being used to develop two submarine reactors.

One of the engines will be used to power a seventh Astute Class attack submarine and one will be for the first of the next generation of nuclear-deterrent submarines – the Vanguard, which can deploy Trident ballistic missiles carrying nuclear warheads.

They will replace the four existing Vanguards, the first of which is due to leave service in 2022.

The Government has said that a final decision on renewing the Trident missile system would not be made until 2016 – but long lead times meant that work on the project needs to start now.

Last week, Rolls-Royce signed a 10-year “foundation contract” with the MoD, worth £800 million.

It is aimed at delivering and supporting the UK’s nuclear submarine fleet.

The contract covers the overheads, running and business costs at Rolls-Royce’s submarines sites.

Source – This is Derbyshire