Tag Archives: Video Clip

Explore HMCS Victoria, submarine docked at Canada Place – Video Clip

The Canadian Maritime Force has four Victoria class diesel-electric submarines, formerly Upholder Class submarines of the UK Royal Navy.

The Canadian Maritime Force has four Victoria class diesel-electric submarines, formerly Upholder Class submarines of the UK Royal Navy.

Click on picture for video

HMCS VICTORIA’s displacement  is approximately 2,200 tons surfaced and 2,400 tons submerged.

Covered in  anechoic tiles to reduce her detection by active SONAR, HMCS VICTORIA is 70.3  meters long, 7.6 meters across the beam and has a deep diving depth in excess of  200 meters.

The main hull is constructed of high tensile steel sections  stiffened by circular internal frames. Equipment located outside the main hull  is covered by the Casing, which also gives the crew a safe walkway when the  submarine is surfaced.

The Fin, which helps support the masts, serves as a kind  of keel and provides a raised conning position.

HMCS VICTORIA has six torpedo  tubes and can carry up to eighteen Mark 48 Mod 4 heavyweight torpedoes for use  against surface and sub-surface targets. She is also capable of carrying  sub-harpoon missiles and laying mines.

HMCS VICTORIA’s SONAR sets allow her to  locate and track ships and other submarines “passively”, that is without  transmitting on active sonar and thus giving way her location.

HMCS VICTORIA is  fitted with RADAR for general navigation, attack and search periscopes  (incorporating video recording and thermal imaging), and an Electronic Support  Measures suite.

HMCS VICTORIA has two diesel generators, each capable of  producing up to 1,410 kilowatts, and one main motor. The generators are used to  charge two main batteries, each consisting of 240 battery cells. These batteries  are used to power the submarine, which can reach a submerged speed of up to 20  knots.

The HMCS Victoria is one of several Canadian navy vessels anchoring in  Vancouver this weekend.

The long-range hunter-killer submarine will be docked at Canada Place until  Sunday, along with the HMCS Algonquin, a destroyer.

While the Algonquin is open to the public, who can enter the ship and meet  the crew, the Victoria is not. But you can take a tour in this video.

The Victoria, decommissioned in 1994, is 70.3 meters long, 7.6 meters across  the beam, and has a deep diving depth in excess of 200 meters. It has a crew of  280. It also has six torpedo tubes and can carry up to eighteen heavyweight  torpedoes for use against surface and sub-surface targets. The Victoria is also  capable of laying mines. The submarine can reach a submerged speed of up to 20  knots.

Source – Vancouver Sun

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Royal Navy submarine HMS Alliance restoration under way – Video Clip

 

The restoration of a World War II submarine is expected to be completed next year.

HMS Alliance, based at the Royal Navy Submarine Museum in Gosport, Hampshire, is undergoing a £6.75m revamp.

The project, which was awarded £3.4m by the Heritage Lottery Fund, still has a shortfall of £200,000 and efforts continue to raise the cash.

Work on the 1940s submarine, which will be a memorial to 5,300 British submariners who gave their lives in service between 1904 and the present day, started in October 2011 and expected to finish in

ALLIANCE RENOVATION UPDATE – Video Clip

TAKEN FROM WIKIPEDIA

HMS Alliance is a Royal Navy A-class, Amphion-class or Acheron-class submarine, laid down towards the end of the Second World War and completed in 1947. The submarine is the only surviving example of the class, having been a memorial and museum ship since 1981.

The Amphion-class submarines were designed for use in the Far East, where the size of the Pacific Ocean made long range, high surface speed and relative comfort for the crew important features to allow for much larger patrol areas and longer periods at sea than British submarines operating in the Atlantic or Mediterranean had to contend with. Alliance was one of the seven A-class boats completed with a snort mast – the other boats all had masts fitted by 1949.

History

From 9 October 1947 until 8 November the submarine undertook a lengthy experimental cruise in the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Africa to investigate the limits of the snort mast, remaining submerged for 30 days.

Between 1958 and 1960 Alliance was extensively modernised by having the deck gun and external torpedo tubes removed, the hull streamlined and the sail replaced with a larger (26 feet 6 inch high), more streamlined one constructed of aluminium. The purpose of these modifications was to make the submarine quieter and faster underwater. Following the modifications the wireless transmitting aerial was supported on a frame behind the sail; but was later replaced with a whip aerial on the starboard side of the fin which could be rotated hydraulically to a horizontal position.

The original gun access hatch was retained however, allowing Alliance to be equipped with a small calibre deck gun again when serving in the Far East during the Indonesian Confrontation of the earlier 1960s.

In May 1961 the pennant numbers of British submarines were changed so that all surviving submarines completed after the Second World War were now numbered from S01 upwards, and Alliance was given the number S67.

On or around 30 September 1971 a fatal battery explosion occurred on board, whilst at Portland.

From 1973 until 1979 she was the static training boat at the HMS Dolphin shore establishment, replacing HMS Tabard in this role. In August 1979, she was towed to Vosper Ship Repairers Limited’s yard at Southampton to have her keel strengthened so that she could be lifted out of the water and preserved as a memorial to those British submariners who have died in service. Since 1981 the submarine has been a museum ship, raised out of the water and on display at the Royal Navy Submarine Museum in Gosport.

Damage to the stern of Alliance in 2008

 

Although listed on the National Historic Fleet, Core Collection, in recent years as many as 100 pigeons have been nesting in the submarine, causing extensive corrosive damage. She also sits on cradles over sea water, adding to problems of corrosion and preventing easy and economical maintenance to her exterior. Urgent restoration work is required to save the boat, and a major restoration program is underway, which includes reclaiming land beneath HMS Alliance using a cofferdam and backfill. This will also provide easy access for future maintenance and new viewing platforms for visitors, additionally opening up the conning tower and casing. A new HMS Alliance gallery is also part of the project to help ensure visitors fully appreciate the significance of this submarine and what she represents. It was announced on 30 May 2011 that HMS Alliance would share in a £11 million Heritage Lottery Fund grant. Alliance will receive £3.4 million to repair her bow and stern and address extensive surface corrosion.

HMS Alliance on display at Royal Navy Submarine Museum
Career Royal Navy Ensign
Ordered: 1943 Emergency war programme
Builder: Vickers Armstrong, Barrow-in-Furness
Laid down: 13 March 1945
Launched: 28 July 1945
Commissioned: 14 May 1947
Decommissioned: 1973, static training boat until August 1979
Identification: Pennant number: P147 (S67 from 1961)
Fate: Museum ship/memorial since 1981 at Royal Navy Submarine Museum
General characteristics
Displacement: 1,360/1,590 tons (surface/submerged) 1,385/1,620 tons after streamlining
Length: 281 ft 4.75 in (85.7695 m)
Beam: 22 ft 3 in (6.78 m)
Draught: 17 ft (5.2 m)
Propulsion: Two 2,150 hp (at 450 rpm) supercharged Vickers 8-cylinder diesel engine, Two 625 hp electric motors for use underwater, driving two shafts
Speed: 18.5/8 knots (surface/submerged) 18.5/10 knots after streamlining
Range: 10,500 nautical miles (19,400 km) at 11 knots (20 km/h) surfaced 16 nautical miles (30 km) at 8 knots (15 km/h) submerged 90 nautical miles (170 km) at 3 knots (6 km/h) submerged
Endurance: 36 hours submerged at 2.5 knots
Test depth: 500 ft (150 m)
Complement: 5 officers, 56 ratings (63 ratings after modernisation in 1960)
Armament: Six 21-inch bow torpedo tubes (including 2 external dry close fit) Four 21-inch stern torpedo tubes (including 2 external dry close fit) 20 torpedoes carried (externals could not be reloaded at sea) Mark V mines could be launched from the internal tubes External tubes removed during streamlining/modernisation. One QF 4 inch Mark XXIII deck gun on S2 mounting One 20 mm AA Oerlikon 20 mm gun on Mark VII mounting Submarine was briefly fitted with a twin Oerlikon on Mark 12A mounting. All guns removed during streamlining/modernisation.

Source – BBC News, Wikipedia, Youtube

 

Two North Korean Submarines Allegedly Missing – Video Clip

Mini Submarines at Pipa Got Naval Base, North Korea

Two North Korean submarines have reportedly disappeared from  port. Although the subs were last seen at a naval base in the Hwanghae Province  in early April, the news is just now filtering out to media outlets. While the  capability of North Korea to shoot a long-range missile at the United States has  largely been nixed during press conference about EMP attack threats, the possibility of a missile attack from  a submarine has rarely been mentioned.

The thought of missing North Korean subs aiming a missile at a coastal city  is causing concern for some Americans. While any coastal city could become a  target, some analysts think California is a very likely location. If North Korea  shot a missile along the coast of the state, some feel than an earthquake could  occur and allow the attack to go largely undetected – at least for a time.

North Korea also allegedly bought 1,452 pounds of silver from China. Some  researchers believe the silver was purchased to use for batteries on the Sang-O  (Shark) mini-subs. Generals in the North Korean Navy allegedly feel the Shark  submarines are viable weapons which could be used against both America and South  Korea. The Sang-O submarines are typically considered coastal submarines. The  subs can reportedly carry at least 15 crew members and a dozen scuba  commandos.

While many Americans might believe that a missing North Korean submarine  trolling the coast would quickly be detected, that may not necessarily be the  case. During a recent discussion about the EMP Commission, Dr. William Forstchen  highlighted just how real the possibility is for an EMP attack from a cargo ship or a submarine.

In 2012, a Russian boomer went unnoticed for nearly a month in US waters on  the Gulf of Mexico. The nuclear-powered submarine sighting was not the only such  occurrence in recent history. In 2009, another Russian submarine patrolled very  close to the United States. The incident happened about the same time as Russian  bombers were spotted in restricted airspace near Alaska and  California.

Dr. Forstchen, a North Carolina college professor said just how woefully unprepared America is for an EMP attack. The  professor wrote the bestselling novel One Second  After. The book details the chaos which occurred in a small town after  an EMP attack. His research was cited on the floor of Congress during  discussions about EMP threats and the vulnerability of the power grid.

As the renowned professor so aptly noted, life as we know it would end  without a functioning power grid. The nation’s electrical systems could be  repaired, but most of the necessary components are made in China. The time frame  to repair a downed power grid is a hotly disputed topic, but a quick flip of the  switch after a visit to the storage room would not be a possibility. Many  experts feel that it would take months, if not years, to get the overly-taxed

The bestselling author also pointed out the many ways a downed power grid  would increase the EMP attack death toll sooner rather than later. The most  obvious and immediate impact would involve the thousands of Americans who would  perish when planes near the EMP zone would fall from the sky.

Without power, hospitals with still-functioning generators would not be able  to keep patients alive after they run out of stored fuel. Grocery stores would  reportedly have only empty shelves after about three days, leaving those without  a garden or ability to hunt or fish with very empty stomachs. Civil unrest would  also cause an unthinkable amount of deaths, according to Dr. Forstchen.

The EMP Commission was established under a Republican-controlled  Congress in 2001. The commission was re-established under a Democratic majority  in 2006. The EMP preparedness commission was disbanded in 2008. EMPact America  is an outspoken advocate for re-convening the Congressional commission to  further preparedness efforts.

How concerned are you about the missing North Korea missing submarines and  the possibility of a downed power grid?

Source – The Inquisitr

Submariner calls for official presentation of Arctic convoy medals – Video Clip

A World War Two submariner has said the long-awaited Arctic convoy medals awarded to him and his comrades ought to be presented officially.

 

Eric Wills, aged 92, of Kingsthorpe, made two treacherous journeys between Britain and Russia, protecting vital supplies that kept Stalin’s soldiers fighting on behalf of the Allies.

He is one of more than 200 remaining survivors of the Arctic convoys and is finally due to be sent an Arctic Star medal from the UK government. He said: “I was thrilled to bits when I heard we’d finally been recognised. But it would be nice for there to be some sort of presentation rather than it being handed over by the postman.

“It seems there are a handful of us left in Northampton so it would be a worthwhile ceremony.”

Although the Russian Government had issued several anniversary medals to Arctic Convoy veterans, the British Government had never done so. Unofficially, the reason was believed to be that Britain and Russia became Cold War enemies soon after World War Two, so a decoration linked to Russian aid was thought inappropriate.

However, veterans told of enduring horrific weather conditions of minus 30C and mammoth waves for the Allied war effort, as well as enemy fire from land, sea, air and beneath the water.

Even submarines were not able to keep out of the terrifying conditions, Mr Wills said.

“We were a close escort to the ships we were protecting, which meant we had to be on the surface all the way to Russia unless the really heavy German ships attacked,” he recalled. “It was an unusual job from that aspect alone.

“But we were told that if we dived there was a good chance we’d hit our own convoy’s depth charges. As a result we were very exposed to enemy planes.”

Roger Conroy, Mayor of Northampton, said: “We need to recognise what they went through because I think it’s despicable how they’ve been ignored.

“I, for one, would be fully supportive of an official presentation of the medal, and I’d be prepared to do it myself if that’s allowed.”

Councillor Conroy said any potential recipients of the Arctic Star, or families of deceased veterans who have applied for the medal, can contact the Chronicle & Echo on Northampton 467033 so interest in a local medals’ ceremony can be gauged.

Source – Northampton Chronicle

Royal Navy funnies – Shep Woolley – Video Clips

Whilst scanning the resources for submarine news and views etc. I came across these beauties on Youtube. I’d forgotten all about this fellow and his tunes.

I apologise for veering off track a bit here but thought they might stir a few old memories and remind a few of us about times gone by.

Hope you like!

Messing around in the dockyard

Ram it

Watching the Ships sail by

First nuclear submarine disaster marks 50-year anniversary – Video Clip

USS Thresher sank in Atlantic in 1963

USS Thresher

Click on picture for Video Clip – USS Thresher

Bob Miller – USS Thresher Veteran

 Fifty years ago next month, the U.S. Navy suffered one of the worst disasters in submarine history when the USS Thresher sank, killing all aboard. A North County man still feels the impact of that disaster on that day in April 50 years ago.

“It was one of a kind,” said Bob Miller of Vista. Miller was among a handful of sailors who was actually aboard the USS Thresher during its launch on July 9, 1960.

Three years later, the nuclear-powered submarine sank in the Atlantic, killing the 129 people aboard.

The USS Thresher was designed to go faster and deeper than anything that came before it.

Miller had been to sea on the submarine at least 40 different times but in 1963, the electronics technician made a decision to advance his career and go to school. It was a decision that saved his life.

“I was driving back from school with three others in the car,” he said. “When I heard the news that Thresher had sunk, I blacked out.”

It was later determined that a weld on a pipe or valve gave way, which flooded the engine room and ultimately doomed everyone on board. The submarine sank in about 5,000 feet of water.

Initially, Miller was haunted by what had happened.

“I kept thinking that maybe if I was there, I could’ve done something to help save her,” he said.

Miller said he has since come to realize that those who were aboard that fateful day were as skilled as anyone who ever sailed and that did all they could.

Miller is preparing to attend the 50-year memorial in Maine next month. A second nuclear-powered submarine, the USS Scorpion, sank five years later under different circumstances.

Source – ABC 10 News

How did Israel’s Dakar submarine sink 45 years ago? – Video Clip

Israel’s archive is allowing the publication of 16 historic documents relating to the submarine’s disappearance and the subsequent search operation, but the answers are not surfacing easily.

The Dakar Submarine 1968

The Dakar Submarine 1968

The State Archives is slated to release a series of secret documents today related to the sinking of the Israel Navy’s Dakar submarine in 1968, which caused the death of 69 Israeli sailors. These documents include an Israel Navy report from 1968 that does not disqualify a “hostile act by the Soviet fleet,” and Foreign Ministry correspondence which notes that Turkey refused to allow Israel to search along its coastline “out of Turkish pride.”

Remnants of the submarine were discovered on the Mediterranean seabed 14 years ago, “but the question as to the circumstances of the sinking remain open to this day,” according to sources at the State Archives.

Now, almost exactly 45 years after the disaster, the archive is allowing the publication of 16 historic documents relating to the submarine’s disappearance and the subsequent search operation. This includes Foreign Ministry cables and the minutes of cabinet meetings beginning on January 26, 1968 − one day after communication was lost with the submarine, which was on a training mission on its way to Haifa.

Even after all these years, there still remain some classified documents that cannot be published in full. These include the classified 87-page report handed over to Dayan by then-navy commander Maj. Gen. Shlomo Harel on March 1, 1968.

That report is on track to be published in its entirety in five years. In the meantime, the State Archives and Israel Defense Forces archives department have cooperated to publish the main findings now.

From the material cleared for publication, it appears that the navy pointed to three possible reasons for the submarine’s sinking. First on the list is “technical fault or human error,” second is “hostile action by the Soviet fleet − a possibility that cannot be fully discarded,” and third is “a collision with another seagoing craft.”

In 45 years, there has been no confirmation that the Soviets were involved in sinking the submarine.

The complete report − of which only a few, secret copies were distributed − is currently stored in the IDF’s archives department. It has not been made available to the public because 50 years have not yet passed since it was drafted.

Other documents released by the State Archives reveal Turkey’s refusal to allow Israel to scour its coastline to search for remnants of the submarine.

On February 2, 1968, Daniel Laor, Israel’s diplomatic representative in Ankara, reported that Israel’s military attache had asked the Turkish chief of staff to allow Israel Navy ships and planes to search along part of Turkey’s southern coastline. The Turks refused, but agreed to conduct their own search operation with Israel’s guidance.

“I expressed disappointment that they raised difficulties,” Laor wrote.

In another cable sent to the Foreign Ministry, Laor offered several explanations for why the Turks refused to allow Israel to search for the submarine. The first was security-related: “It is a sensitive area between Cyprus and Turkey where air, sea and ground forces were gathering prior to an invasion of Cyprus. Turkey is not interested in having foreign ships searching its waters without its supervision,” he wrote.

Cyprus was invaded in 1974, six years later.

Laor noted another possible reason: “Turkish pride, based on the pretense that they could do it better than us.” Eventually, however, Turkey helped facilitate Israel’s extensive search operation. Last week marked the 45th anniversary since then-Defense Minister Moshe Dayan proclaimed that the Dakar and its crew were “missing.” A memorial now stands in the Mount Herzl military cemetery for the Dakar’s 69 crew members who perished.

Source – Haaretz