Tag Archives: China

China buys 4 submarines, 24 fighters from Russia

China has agreed to buy 24 Su-35 fighters and four Lada-class submarines from Russia in recent arms purchase deals signed shortly before President Xi Jinping‘s just-concluded visit to Russia, China Central Television reported on Sunday.

The deals raised concern among some regional players and media. Chinese observers said the reaction was “unnecessary” because the purchase is not directed at any third party.

A Russian Su-35 fighter jet. The Su-35 is currently the most advanced Russian fighter jet in mass production.  [File Photo]

The purchases represented “the first time in nearly 10 years” that China had bought large military technological equipment from Russia, the report said.

The four submarines will be jointly designed and built by both countries, with two of them to be built in Russia and the other two in China.

“The Su-35 fighters can effectively reduce pressure on China’s air defense before Chinese-made stealth fighters come online,” the report said.

Li Hong, secretary-general of the China Arms Control and Disarmament Association, said the recent purchases and joint building plan serve as an indicator of the evolution of the overall Sino-Russian strategic partnership.

“It is the natural, well-deserved fruit of bilateral defense cooperation, and both sides have made it clear that the bilateral strategic partnership is not targeting anyone,” Li said.

As for some countries and their speculation on the intentions behind the arms deals, Li said China is not the only country that has signed big arms deals with Russia recently.

Shengyang Aircraft Corporation, a Chinese civilian and military aircraft manufacturer who is engaged in the production of J-11BS fighters and the development of J-15 and J-16 fighters, will not participate in the production of Su-35 fighters. [File Photo]

Geng Yansheng, a spokesman of the Ministry of National Defense, said last month that Sino-Russian cooperation on military technology is not directed at a third party, and that it will facilitate peace and stability in the world and the region.

The enhanced agenda of bilateral defense cooperation also has seen Xi, who is also chairman of the Central Military Commission, visit Russia’s Defense Ministry on Saturday.

Xi is the first Chinese head of state to have made the tour, and he said the idea of visiting the ministry was proposed by Russian President Vladimir Putin.

The world is still unequal, unbalanced and tumultuous, with challenges of both “traditional and nontraditional” threats, as well as the further spreading of turmoil in some areas, Xi said.

China and Russia, in the face of complicated international situation, should strengthen their coordination, and work with the international community to deal with all kinds of challenges and threats, he said.

Meng Xiangqing, deputy director of the Strategic Research Institute at the National Defense University of the PLA, said the meetings have shown a profound development of both countries’ armed forces in the field of “pragmatic cooperation” in addition to friendly gestures.

On Sunday, Chang Wanquan, Chinese State councilor and defense minister, said during a meeting with Russian Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu that wide-ranging and multilayer defense cooperation has become a cornerstone of the China-Russia comprehensive strategic partnership.

“Given the complex international scenario today, China-Russia strategic cooperation and coordination will not only benefit the two peoples, but also help promote world peace and stability,” he said.

Shoigu, for his part, hailed the “unprecedented high level” of the Sino-Russian strategic partnership. The consensus reached by the top leaders has shown the direction of future development of bilateral ties, he said.

 

A file photo of a Su-35 fighter jet. [Photo: bbs.ychouse.cq.cn]

Two of the submarines will be built in Russia, and the other two will be built in China. [File Photo]

A file photo of a Lada-class submarine. [Photo: armystar.com]

 

Source – China.org.cn

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Suspicious buoy drop highlights Asian submarine tensions

Chinese People’s Liberation Army–Navy (PLA-N) ships earlier this week dropped a number of mysterious buoys around a group of islands in the East China Sea, and although Beijing says they are to monitor ocean conditions, suspicions abound.

The islands are the disputed string called Senkaku by Japan and Diaoyu by China and have for many years been the centre of an increasingly nationalistic tussle between the two powers.

Multiple military planes and ships belligerently traverse the area, inflaming tensions, but submarines have mainly been overlooked.

The buoys may really be for a scientific experiment, as Chinese foreign ministry officials claim, but it is more likely they are part of an expanding system of submarine detectors or sonobuoys China is using to monitor Japanese submarines.

Some were dropped just 300m from Japanese-controlled waters.

While surface tension and conflicts are featured in the news media, beneath the waves submarines are almost forgotten.

Submarines more active

Submarine detection is difficult in the noisy and shallow waters typical of the South China Sea and the East China Sea. Acoustic energy from passive and active sonar technology is more likely to reflect off the seabed than in deeper waters, such as in the Philippine Sea.

Both countries have a number of different classes of submarines but the Chinese diesel-electric vessels are noisier than Japan’s more advanced similarly powered craft.

But the PLA-N’s newest Jin-class nuclear-powered ballistic missile submarines (SSBNs) are a mighty addition to Chinese undersea capabilities. While only two are assumed to be operational, and China is struggling with nuclear power at sea, they add serious firepower to its fleet.

And they may soon be equipped with JL-2 nuclear-tipped ballistic missiles, which, according to initial estimates, can reach the United States, meaning America’s nuclear deterrence strategy would be undermined.

A submarine’s stealth makes it ideally suited for operating in restricted or sensitive waters, making them ideal for the tense waters around the Senkaku/ Diaoyu islands.

The reason for such tension becomes very clear on a map. Geographically, they occupy an extremely strategic position for both Japan and China.

They are a gateway for China into the greater Western Pacific. Controlling them would effectively allow the PLA-N to break out of the claustrophobic South China Sea, a result they desperately desire.

Likewise, keeping them in Tokyo’s hands would help Japan pen China into their territorial waters and put a temporary lid on Beijing’s expansionist dreams.

Beijing’s strategy

China’s development of a world-class submarine fleet is in its infancy, but even now Beijing can quietly project power a significant distance from its shores.

This is why the outcome of the Senkaku/Diaoyu islands dispute is so important for both nations. Controlling them would give Chinese submarines unfettered access to the Western Pacific and increase Beijing’s strategic options in the Eastern Pacific.

It would also open up the rest of the Pacific for exploration by its submarines, possibly sailing with nuclear-tipped ballistic missiles.

Only the US and Russia possess similar capabilities. Adding a third nation to the list will radically alter the strategic nuclear leverage America has enjoyed in the Pacific since the end of the Cold War.

Ultimately, Tokyo will not end its submarine patrols around the disputed islands, despite the Chinese sonobuoy drop. Submarines are an integral part of the monitoring of major sea routes to Japan.

With heightened military movements in the region the chance of an accident increases. And with so much firepower in close proximity should the US become involved – along with widespread and popular nationalism in both Japan and China – the need to tread carefully to avoid escalating hostilities is paramount.

Source – National Business Review

China – Naval officer questioned over submarine espionage probe

// TAIPEI–A rear admiral was questioned by military prosecutors last week in connection with an investigation into alleged leaks of submarine nautical charts to China, the Ministry of National Defense (MND) said Monday.

//

The rear admiral was summoned as part of an inquiry into a suspected espionage case involving Chang Chih-hsin, a former chief officer in charge of political warfare at the Naval Meteorology Oceanography (METOC) Office, MND spokesman Maj. Gen. Luo Shou-he said.

Luo did not reveal the name or position of the naval officer or further details of the case, because of the need to maintain confidentiality in the ongoing legal case.

The Chinese-language United Daily News (UDN) first reported the new twist in the case Monday.

It said that a senior naval officer in active service was questioned for a full day and overnight last week and has since been transferred to Navy Command Headquarters to facilitate follow-up inquiries after serving as commander of a fleet.

Military sources said the Navy has assigned another officer to take over the rear admiral’s job.

The Defense Ministry confirmed last October that Chang Chih-hsin was arrested a month earlier on suspicion of obtaining classified information through former military colleagues and using it for illegal gains, but it denied that his actions had resulted in the exposure of military secrets.

According to the latest UDN report, Chang, along with a lieutenant at the Naval Fleet Command and a retired missile officer in the Navy, has been detained and indicted on charges of leaking military secrets for illegal gains.

The report further said the trio had told prosecutors that they interacted closely with an active service naval real admiral.

After investigating the claims and collecting evidence for several months, military prosecutors decided to summon the suspect for questioning last week, the report said.

Although the senior officer was released after questioning, military prosecutors are still investigating his possible role in the case, the report said.

The newspaper quoted military sources as saying that if the officer was found to have been involved in spying, it would represent the worst espionage scandal since the “Lo Hsien-che” case.

Lo, an Army general who was lured by a honey trap into spying for China during his time at Taiwan’s representative office in Thailand, was sentenced to life in prison and has been in jail since July 2011.

Although relations across the Taiwan Strait have improved significantly over the past five years, China has not renounced the use of force against Taiwan, and it continues to actively spy on the self-governed island it claims as its own, often through active or retired Taiwanese military officers.

Source – The China Post

Chinese Submarine Training

Submarine flotilla in training
Recently, the officers and men of a submarine flotilla under the North China Sea Fleet of the Navy of the Chinese People's Liberation Army (PLA) conducted routine training. The photo features the scene of the training. (chinamil.com.cn/Li Zhikai)
Recently, the officers and men of a submarine flotilla under the North China Sea Fleet of the Navy of the Chinese People’s Liberation Army (PLA) conducted routine training. The photo features the scene of the training. (chinamil.com.cn/Li Zhikai)
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Recently, the officers and men of a submarine flotilla under the North China Sea Fleet of the Navy of the Chinese People's Liberation Army (PLA) conducted routine training. The photo features the scene of the training. (chinamil.com.cn/Li Zhikai)
Recently, the officers and men of a submarine flotilla under the North China Sea Fleet of the Navy of the Chinese People’s Liberation Army (PLA) conducted routine training. The photo features the scene of the training. (chinamil.com.cn/Li Zhikai)
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Recently, the officers and men of a submarine flotilla under the North China Sea Fleet of the Navy of the Chinese People's Liberation Army (PLA) conducted routine training. The photo features the scene of the training. (chinamil.com.cn/Li Zhikai)
Recently, the officers and men of a submarine flotilla under the North China Sea Fleet of the Navy of the Chinese People’s Liberation Army (PLA) conducted routine training. The photo features the scene of the training. (chinamil.com.cn/Li Zhikai)
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Recently, the officers and men of a submarine flotilla under the North China Sea Fleet of the Navy of the Chinese People's Liberation Army (PLA) conducted routine training. The photo features the scene of the training. (chinamil.com.cn/Li Zhikai)
Recently, the officers and men of a submarine flotilla under the North China Sea Fleet of the Navy of the Chinese People’s Liberation Army (PLA) conducted routine training. The photo features the scene of the training. (chinamil.com.cn/Li Zhikai)
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Recently, the officers and men of a submarine flotilla under the North China Sea Fleet of the Navy of the Chinese People's Liberation Army (PLA) conducted routine training. The photo features the scene of the training. (chinamil.com.cn/Li Zhikai)
Recently, the officers and men of a submarine flotilla under the North China Sea Fleet of the Navy of the Chinese People’s Liberation Army (PLA) conducted routine training. The photo features the scene of the training. (chinamil.com.cn/Li Zhikai)
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Recently, the officers and men of a submarine flotilla under the North China Sea Fleet of the Navy of the Chinese People's Liberation Army (PLA) conducted routine training. The photo features the scene of the training. (chinamil.com.cn/Li Zhikai)
Recently, the officers and men of a submarine flotilla under the North China Sea Fleet of the Navy of the Chinese People’s Liberation Army (PLA) conducted routine training. The photo features the scene of the training. (chinamil.com.cn/Li Zhikai)
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Recently, the officers and men of a submarine flotilla under the North China Sea Fleet of the Navy of the Chinese People's Liberation Army (PLA) conducted routine training. The photo features the scene of the training. (chinamil.com.cn/Li Zhikai)
Recently, the officers and men of a submarine flotilla under the North China Sea Fleet of the Navy of the Chinese People’s Liberation Army (PLA) conducted routine training. The photo features the scene of the training. (chinamil.com.cn/Li Zhikai)
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Recently, the officers and men of a submarine flotilla under the North China Sea Fleet of the Navy of the Chinese People's Liberation Army (PLA) conducted routine training. The photo features the scene of the training. (chinamil.com.cn/Li Zhikai)
Recently, the officers and men of a submarine flotilla under the North China Sea Fleet of the Navy of the Chinese People’s Liberation Army (PLA) conducted routine training. The photo features the scene of the training. (chinamil.com.cn/Li Zhikai)
Source – Global times

China – Submarine drill in Yellow Sea

Recently, a maritime protection and rescue flotilla of the North China Sea Fleet under the Navy of the Chinese People’s Liberation Army (PLA) conducted a submarine rescue and lifesaving drill in the waters of the Yellow Sea. The success of this drill marks that the flotilla has the ability to conduct deep sea rescue for all types of submarines of the PLA Navy.

Source – China.org

Submarines recommended as way for Taiwan to better deter China

Scott Bates – President of the Washington-based Centre for National Policy (CNP)

Washington D.C., Dec. 20 (CNA) The head of an American think tank suggested Thursday that Taiwan should purchase submarines to strengthen its naval deployment amid the growing military imbalance between Taiwan and China

Taiwan can put pressure on the Chinese armed forces with a stronger naval defense that includes submarines, argued Scott Bates, president of the Washington-based Center for National Policy (CNP), at a panel discussion in which he and two other U.S. scholars shared their observations from a trip to Taiwan in early December.

“It seems this (submarine) is a perfect naval asset for the defense of Taiwan in the protection of freedom and navigation in the Straits, in the South China and in the East China seas. And the current array of submarine forces that Taiwan has is not up to achieving those missions,” Bates said.

Although Taiwan’s policies do not include attacking Chinese civilians, its Air Force and Navy are not currently strong enough to deter China’s People’s Liberation Army, Bates said.

Taiwan’s people may currently be unwilling to spend too much on national defense, which can cost a lot, but Taiwan still has to recognize the military imbalance across the Taiwan Strait, Bates warned.

One of the ways the country’s military wants to address the imbalance is by buying advanced F-16 C/D fighter jets from the United States to bolster its arsenal, but Washington has yet to agree to the sale.

Bates suggested, however, that Taiwan consider other air assets than the more expensive F-16 C/D aircraft.

“I would suggest the Taiwanese consider the development of drone assets as well for the air. I think there are a lot of air assets that they can think about that are not as expensive and so that each year you’re not set up for the idea that if you get this one magic system all will be well,” Bates said.

“I think that other options need to be developed. (That) doesn’t mean you give up on getting those other assets but you look at some new ones as well.”

Taiwan’s Air Force can hardly be compared with that of China, Bates said, but it could put pressure on the Chinese armed forces with a stronger naval defense.

Bates also suggested that the U.S. government provide military training and defensive arms to Taiwan.

Source – Focus Taiwan

 

China Mulls Buying Russian Submarines

State arms exporter Rosoboronexport has signed a framework agreement with China on the joint development and construction of four non-nuclear Amur-1650 conventional submarines for the Chinese Navy, a news report said Thursday.

The final contract is tentatively worth $2 billion and is expected to be signed by the parties no earlier than 2015, Kommersant reported.

The agreement stipulates for two of the submarines to be built in Russia and two in China, with special provisions in place in the contract to ensure that no intellectual property is copied from the Russian side, a source close to Rosoboronexport told the business daily.

An additional agreement for the first stage of work could be signed by the end of the year, he said, adding that a Russian contractor had not yet been selected for construction of the submarines.

China may become the first buyer of the Amur-1650 submarines, beating out India and Venezuela, both of which previously expressed interest, Kommersant said.

Another source close to the arms exporter said the submarine contract “is very important for Russia and tops the presidential list of projects with China.”

Source – The Moscow Times