Tag Archives: Conventional Submarine

Aus – Collins one of the most capable conventional submarines

THE navy has defended its troubled Collins-class submarines, saying it had to identify properly all of their faults in a report to help determine whether their service life could be extended.

Defence said the Collins remained one of the most capable conventional submarines in the world despite a report, revealed in The Australian this week, that found 68 critical faults that could force the boats into early retirement.

The report by the Defence Materiel Organisation late last year found hopes of extending the life of the six Collins submarines until the 2030s when new submarines could be built would be “unachievable” unless urgent action was taken to fix major systems faults aboard each boat.It revealed that the submarines were getting hotter, heavier and noisier each year and detailed flaws in the diesel engines, command and control systems, periscopes, sonars and other key systems and equipment.

This contrasted with the sanitised public summary of the report given by the former Labor government that focused on a single sentence in the report saying that there was “no single technical issue” which would prevent the service life of the boats being extended.The report’s findings have left the new Coalition government with difficult choices about whether to attempt to extend the life of the submarine fleet or purchase or lease smaller submarines as an interim measure to ensure Australia continues to have submarines to defend it into the early 2030s.

Defence said the submarines were subject to a rigorous safety and certification system and were operated by a dedicated and well-trained team of officers and sailors.It said The Australian’s articles were based on “an internal report prepared by the Defence Materiel Organisation which examined the feasibility of extending the life of the Collins-class submarine”.

“The purpose of the report was to identify potential issues and risks that would need to be addressed to extend the life of the class,” Defence said.”This is a common and normal process to be followed if consideration is being given to the life-extension of any system. It was always expected that the report would identify systems that would require attention should a life-extension be required.”Defence said many of these were already known and some were being addressed in planned upgrades or through continuous improvement programs.”As with any risk analysis, a risk must first be identified before it can be assessed and determined whether controls will need to be put in place to manage the risk,” it said.Defence said there had been “significant improvement” in submarine availability over the past 15 months. It said its submarines were “busy operating domestically and as far afield as conducting exercises in Japan and Hawaii”.

“This is a testament to the hard work being conducted by all members of the submarine enterprise involved in the sustainment of the Collins-class submarine,” it said. The DMO report made it clear that any plan to extend the life of the Collins fleet would be high risk.

Source – The Australian

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Conventional (AIP) Submarine – a Weapon of Choice for the 21st Century, Says Frost & Sullivan

Example - Russian AMUR-1650 CONVENTIONAL SUBMARINE

Example – Russian AMUR-1650 CONVENTIONAL SUBMARINE

Demand for conventional submarines, mainly with AIP on board, set to grow despite defence budget cuts

The modern non-nuclear, conventional diesel-electric submarine (SSK) with air-independent propulsion systems (AIP) is a complex, multi-role and extremely powerful weapon system. The submarine is able to deploy a wide range of weapons and conducting various missions ranging from anti-submarine, anti-surface vessels warfare to intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance.

According to Frost & Sullivan, despite the implementation of austerity measures and defence budget reductions in many countries, the demand for conventional submarines, mainly with AIP on board, will grow at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 1.8 per cent globally during 2013–2022 and present revenue opportunities of up to USD 34.80 billion.

“The naval operations environment has changed significantly; operations at sea have moved from the ‘blue water’ open ocean to the ‘brown water’ shallow costal environment,” noted Frost & Sullivan Aerospace, Defence & Security Industry Analyst, Dominik Kimla. “The importance of smaller and quieter conventional submarines, rather than larger, nuclear-powered, has increased significantly.”

However, the submerge endurance of AIP SSK cannot as yet be compared with that of nuclear-powered attack submarines (SSN). Nevertheless, AIP technology is evolving rapidly with more reliable and powerful AIP solutions expected within a decade. The AIP system is seen as a must-have capability for newly procured SSKs. Moreover, the through-life cost of SSK AIP, in comparison to SSN, is three to four times lower, not to mention the high cost related to the deactivation of SSN.

Asia-Pacific (APAC) and Europe appear to be the two most attractive markets at present. Frost & Sullivan forecasts that the SSK market in APAC will grow at a CAGR of 2.1 per cent and account for 47.2 per cent of the global demand for conventional submarines (2013-2022). “APAC countries are in the process of expanding their underwater capabilities with stealthy SSK,” added Mr. Kimla. “All major Navies in the region are implementing submarine programmes.”

Europe, with a CAGR of 1.5 per cent and a 22.4 per cent global market share, will retain its status as the second largest SSK market over the forecast period. The most prominent ongoing SSK projects are underway in Germany and Italy (type-212), Greece and Turkey (type-214) and Spain (S-80). Additionally, Sweden has been developing its new submarine – A26 project, Norway is looking to replace its Ula class SSK while Poland wants to enter two modern AIP submarines into service by 2022.

“Navies are increasingly looking at modern SSK due to its multi-role capacities and semi-strategic potential. Consequently, modern conventional submarines present significant market opportunities for the submarine sector to sell new boats as well as to retrofit standard SSK with AIP plug in section,” summarised Mr. Kimla. “The Pacific region has experienced the most heavy sea-lane traffic in the world, which needs to be constantly secured. It therefore offers considerable business growth prospects for submarine solutions providers.”

If you would like to learn more about the modern submarine market and/or obtain a Market Insight on the conventional (AIP) submarine market, please contact Joanna Lewandowska, Corporate Communications, at joanna.lewandowska@frost.com. Please include your full contact details in the query. The Market Insight is also available on Slide Share.

About Frost & Sullivan

Frost & Sullivan, the Growth Partnership Company, works in collaboration with clients to leverage visionary innovation that addresses the global challenges and related growth opportunities that will make or break today’s market participants.

Source – PR Newswire